Getting to Know: Cat and Chrystle Cu of Cocofloss!

This post may contain affiliate links. Please see my disclosure to learn more.

unnamed-6Cocofloss is a product created by the sister duo, Cat Cu and Chrystle Cu. Cocofloss is a fun (and highly effective!) floss that is bridging the gap between a socially perceived arduous task, and a walk on the beach. Their vision imagines a future where everyone can keep their teeth for the entirety of their lives! Their reach is on the global scale, helping those at home develop good preventative oral hygiene habits, as well as those outside our borders, who may not have access to the tools and education needed to maintain a healthy smile. The truth of the matter is, flossing is not exactly exciting stuff… until NOW!

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Who are the imaginary minds behind Cocofloss? 

I’m Cat, and I started Cocofloss with my sister, Dr. Chrystle Cu! My sister is a tooth geek, philanthropist, and preventative dentist who graduated from Wellesley College and the Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry. I’m an entrepreneur, yoga-addict, and art-lover. I studied engineering at Stanford and worked in finance, art, and tech before joining forces with Chrystle to start Cocofloss.

What was the inspiration behind creating Cocofloss?

Chrystle is very prevention oriented – she’s that dentist who spends an hour educating each patient about their teeth and gums –  and Cocofloss embodies her dream to make taking care of your smile more effective and fun. Chrystle’s dream is for everyone to be able to keep their teeth for life.

I love how Cocofloss is geared towards making flossing a fun experience! What are some of your favorite aspects of the product?

I love the Caribbean-blue floss color. It evokes freshness and blue oceans full of possibility. And of course, it’s functional! Folks can see their progress flossing as plaque contrasts against the blue threads.

Which one is your favorite flavor? Are there any limited editions to try?

Watermelon! Just launched this summer as a limited run.

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What are ways that Cocofloss can incentivize people to develop good flossing habits?

Cocofloss delivers a flossing experience that’s both rewarding and fun!

When I ask a lot of young patients if they have been flossing, their main excuse is, “We ran out of floss in the house”. Tell us more about your 6 month floss plan!

Would you floss tonight if you knew more floss would be arriving tomorrow? Customer behavior suggests so!

If you guys have ONE piece of pro tip for people who can’t get into flossing, what would it be?

Flossing is an acquired taste. Floss daily for 21 days (the number of days it takes to create a habit) with Cocofloss and soon enough you’ll begin to crave it.

Would you care to share some of your favorite flossophies? 

Our flossophy:

Bliss is a life lived in balance – take an adventure and enjoy the familiarity of home, take something and give back something, set big dreams for the future and enjoy improvisation also, eat your cake and don’t forget to floss too!

I notice that you guys love to travel, just like me! I think it’s especially important that you’ve linked travel with having floss with you, all the time, when you’re on the go. Any tips on how to remember to floss during times when we are busiest and most on the go?

Keep floss in your bag so that you can floss whenever you feel like it and don’t be embarrassed to floss on-the-go! I’m often that awkward human flossing in public or on-the-go.

How is Cocofloss making an impact on a global scale?

We’d like to inspire folks to keep their teeth for life around all corners of the globe. To name a few, we’ve donated Cocofloss to communities in the Caribbean, the Philippines, and Mexico. The worldwide floss party is just getting started.

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I was born in the Philippines, so I share a connection with your mission. I, myself, personally returned home to Manila to give free dental care for a week. Can you share any insight as to how your experience was?

Chrystle:

The global tooth decay epidemic is so painfully real. What people need most is prevention and nutrition education. Unfortunately, sugar is used as a universal rewards across all cultures. We need to shift the way people think about rewards, and instead educate and reward with preventive tools like Cocofloss.

More on Philippines mission trip here (happy to discuss more also): https://cocofloss.com/blogs/cocofloss-life/a-note-to-the-kids-in-bohol-philippines

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How do you envision making preventative dental care attainable to all groups of people?

We’re using the internet and social media as vehicles for prevention education. Our Cocofloss website has free education for all, and we’re on a mission to make flossing something everyone looks forward to daily.

Where will Cocofloss go next?  

We have big plans to help folks find their smile wherever they go. Stay tuned!


A sincere thank you to Cat and Chrystle, who took the time to talk about what Cocofloss has to offer. If you’d like to read more about my personal experience with Cocofloss, check out my review here!

On Trends: Charcoal Toothpaste

Charcoal sure is getting quite the attention these days. It seems that this granulated, activated, ashy celebrity has stolen the spotlight. Instagram posts are covered with picture-worthy activated charcoal-containing foods, such as black scoops of ice-cream atop waffle cones, and seeded black hamburger buns on either side of a beef patty. This ‘coconut ash’ has also been praised to bind toxic drugs and chemicals in the body due to its negative charge, thus pulling out toxins before the stomach can digest them. (Someone has yet to start an all-charcoal diet.) For similar reasons, bits of charcoal are also being integrated into beauty products in the effort to bind dirt and oils, and I’ve seen humans who look like panda bears, mid-exfoliation. Pretty cute. And don’t think I didn’t consider for a moment the use of charcoal sticks in lieu of a water filtration system. In a crazed effort to eliminate plastic use completely while not being open to drinking unfiltered water, I myself fell down a charcoal-obsessed rabbit hole internet search. Drop a stick of charcoal in a jug of water, wait a few hours, and voila! Perfectly delicious drinking water advertised. While I have nothing at all to say about any of these aforementioned things, except maybe to note that charcoal ice cream temporarily stains your teeth the same color as the pint, I do have a few things to say when it comes to this much celebrated charcoal entering our toothpaste.

Why Put Charcoal in Toothpaste?

Have you seen videos of people brushing their teeth with black globs of sticky stuff and wondered to yourself, “Why put charcoal in toothpaste?” Especially after divulging the fact that a first date may be complicated by stained teeth as a result of trying charcoal ice cream with a potential future life partner. Along the same lines of the previous train of thought that activated charcoal can bind to things due to its micro-porous nature, it seems that some are of the mind that it can also bind plaque and bacteria and tartar. There is the added benefit of whiter teeth, as well. So, why don’t we dig deeper about these two topics?

Does Charcoal Like Bacteria?

Not any more than we do! Activated charcoal is porous in nature. The thinking behind removing bacteria with activated charcoal is that plaque and micro-organisms will be caught in the pores of the charcoal particles, and thus be removed. Possible, but it seems that it does this at a similar rate as regular old toothpaste would. So, no, there is no special binding relationship between the new celeb and our bacteria.

Does Charcoal Toothpaste Detoxify?

There isn’t much to say about the detoxifying nature of charcoal toothpaste that so many people claim. The gums and teeth are not at all similar to your liver and kidneys, which take on the job of clearing your body of toxins. Because of this, the charcoal is not exactly detoxifying your body of anything. Of the same token, for those who are using charcoal toothpaste and are concerned about the charcoal affecting your current medications, rest assured that the charcoal is not in contact with the medications in your digestive tract and therefore has no effect. Unless, off course, you are swallowing the toothpaste rather than spitting it out.

Does Charcoal Actually Make Teeth Whiter?

The simple answer is, “Yes it does”. Bizarre, that you can brush with black to make them white! Charcoal is effective in removing surface stains, which isn’t exactly equated to whitening teeth. Surface stains are extrinsic staining on the teeth due to a coffee drinking habit, or the occasional red wine indulgence. These stains reside on the enamel layer which happens to also be the outermost layer of your tooth. Typically, other ‘whitening’ toothpastes remove these stains as well.

However, your teeth can also have intrinsic stains, either caused by trauma, certain medications, weak enamel, or excess fluoride use. These intrinsic stains can not be removed by toothpaste, with or without charcoal, primarily because the toothpaste will never reach these stains. Whitening of intrinsic staining can only occur from bleaching treatments (whether that’s in-office or over-the-counter) that penetrate past the enamel. But if you wish to use charcoal toothpaste to help reduce stains due to a cold brew habit, then charcoal toothpaste will suffice.

Should We Be Wary of Charcoal Toothpaste?

Unfortunately, charcoal is abrasive. Part of what makes it so good at removing extrinsic stains is the fact that it is rough and can rub off discolorations that are stuck in the pores of your teeth (teeth are porous too!). However, the concern is that charcoal acts like sand paper. Anyone who has consumed or brushed with charcoal will know the grainy feeling it leaves in your mouth. Like sandpaper, repetitive use of the stuff can abrade parts of the outer enamel layer. The enamel is the strongest part of our bodies (stronger than bone!) and our teeth need it as protection. Removal of the enamel layer will weaken the tooth and cause hypersensitivity. You know those ‘Zings’ you feel after a tooth whitening session? Well imagine a permanent version of that, if the enamel is removed. Yikes! Ironically, too, the removal of enamel makes the teeth even more prone to staining for future years to come. Enamel is definitely something we want to protect. If you are planning on using charcoal toothpaste, then consider brushing lightly and gently.

Also, before you declutter your regular toothpaste, may I suggest alternating your charcoal toothpaste with the regular one? Who knows? Like all trends, charcoal coolness may fade, and you may be reaching for your trusty familiar toothpaste brand, once again. At the very least, the alternation will help reduce abrasion to your beautiful, pearly whites. Plus, most charcoal toothpastes do not have fluoride, a good protector of teeth. Fluoride is what helps fight dental decay, and as much as we want white teeth, I am sure you would agree that we want to KEEP our teeth even more. Since charcoal is a recent celebrity, it is too early to tell what charcoal is really about. Better to wait until the tabloids (and research) unearth its true qualities before we fall head over heels for this new star.

Cocofloss: Join the Party!

This post may contain affiliate links. Please see my disclosure to learn more.

Much to the bereavement of all of society, flossing is absolutely necessary and cannot be replaced by things such as water-flossers or, say, prayers. All at once now, *collective sigh*. I get it. But there is a new hero in town, one that’s got me (and soon enough, you, too) cheering. I would like to introduce you to a new best friend and awesome travel partner, Cocofloss!

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It would be difficult to argue against the fact that  the hardest part about flossing is the motivation to actually do it. Cocofloss is a creative solution to making flossing (dare we say it?) an inspiring act looked forward to by all. Imagined and brought to life by two sisters, Chrystle and Cat, Cocofloss is all the right sorts of trendy. Chrystle is a dentist and is a flossing-pro. Cat is an artist and a bit more lazier on the flossing front. But together, they make a dynamic duo, saving the world, one tooth at a time.

Cocofloss is not just string in a box. It’s an experience, and I challenge you not to become completely enamored and transformed into a flossing fanatic once you’ve tried it out. Does it sound like I’m a crazed dentist? Maybe a little. I still dare you to try it! Scented with different fruity aromas, flossing transports you elsewhere. A sandy beach at the Caribbean, perhaps? The four standard flavors include Fresh Coconut, Cara Cara Orange, Pure Strawberries, and Delicious Mint. Currently, there is the seasonal Summer Watermelon flavor for post-BBQ hangouts. Once you open the box, delicious scents waft to your nose. Try not to get addicted!

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Now it isn’t just all fun and games. There’s lot to love on the dental front too. Firstly, the string is blue. That isn’t just to make it engaging to look at. The blue string actually makes the plaque that you remove visible. There is a sort of satisfaction in seeing the plaque that you are actively prohibiting from staying in your mouth. Crazed dentist, indeed! Take THAT, plaque!

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Advertised as a loofah for your smile, there is another feature that I absolutely love. The floss is made of multiple, soft, polyester filaments and is coated in vegan wax. The waxy material is easy to glide in between tight contacts. Once you pass the floss through the contact, the fibers seem to spread. In other words, they poof out ever so slightly, filling that gap underneath the contact and covering more surface area while massaging the gums. At the same time, the fibers are very gentle which protects the gums from trauma. Plus, we all know there is strength in numbers! The fibers are even strong enough to remove chunks of calculus and tartar! Off course, there’s a technique for that. For the non-queasy, here’s a video. Viewer discretion advised.

Also, remember how you floss vigorously before your six-month cleaning because you suddenly remembered that flossing was important? Don’t you deny it! Heaven forbid the dentist ever notice. As much as I love holding you accountable for flossing, Cocofloss can do that for you too. Each container has an indicator for how long the floss should last you. The regular packages are a two month’s supply. Once two months are up, you should be finished with your flossing container. If the indicator is not motivation enough, sign up for the six month plan on their website to make sure you are on track between dental visits. Under the six month plan, Cocofloss will ship you a new flavor of your choice every two months, for a total of three flavors, over the course of six months. If you receive your new Cocofloss before you have finished the old one, then maybe that’s an indication that you’ve skipped a day or two (or three or four).

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Lastly, the floss is infused with coconut oil. Which I think is a cool concept, especially considering all the rave about the benefits of oil pulling. However, I would not necessarily say that the coconut oil does much of anything, considering the amount of time it’s in contact with the teeth. Remember that oil pulling requires you to swish coconut oil around your mouth for 20 – 30 minutes! You only floss for a few minutes. The floss itself does a majority of the heavy lifting, but if coconut oil grooves with you, and it gets you to floss, then there you go!

Two things worth noting that could be improved. The floss is housed in a plastic container, although I would like to note that it is advertised as vegan, animal cruelty-free, and is a completely recyclable product. But still, more plastic being circulated around the world. I’m as crazy about plastic packaging as I am about teeth (maybe even more) so for that, I apologize. And secondly, it does come at a bit higher price than other floss. You can find these babies at $8 a piece, although if you buy a package of 3 or more, you will receive a discount. Regardless, if it is the only thing that’ll get you to want to floss every day, I say it’s worth it. Preventative care is the number one most important thing for oral health, and the fact exists that, for most people, flossing just ain’t fun. Cocofloss tries to bridge that gap. We need to make preventative oral health care cool, just like we made smoking cigarettes uncool. Consider it a changing of times, if you will.

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If you’d like to give Cocofloss a try, ordering is easy! This product lines the shelves of Sephora, Nordstrom, and Urban Outfitters, but you can also order here, from the comforts of your home. I have personally tried all five flavors, and I’ve got to tell you that Pure Strawberries is my absolute favorite. Reminds me of farmers markets and strawberry shortcakes! I recommend this product to all my patients, especially kids and younger teens who have yet to develop a flossing habit. Challenge them (or yourself) to floss for 21 days straight (the number of days it takes to form a habit). Let’s introduce a new flossophy to younger generations by teaching them that flossing is actually cool.

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Battle of the Brushes: Manual VS Electric

This post may contain affiliate links. Please see my disclosure to learn more.

We all know that prevention is better than treatment when it comes to your teeth. Wanting the finest for our teeth, we search for the best gadgets to aid us in making sure our pearly whites are nice and healthy. The most often used tool, and thus your tooth’s best friend, is the handy dandy toothbrush. But when it comes time to select your toothbrush of choice, the wide array of choices sitting on the shelf or available on the net can be very, very overwhelming. Looking at the dilemma from the macro-level, I think the most common fork in the road occurs where we have to choose between a manual toothbrush and an electric toothbrush. Here, I will review the pros and cons of both options, and then talk about which one I myself choose to use, and why.

WHO COULD BENEFIT FROM AN ELECTRIC TOOTHBRUSH?

When patients come to me and ask if they need an electric toothbrush, many of them are surprised when I tell them that the answer is no. There are a few groups of people who could benefit from an electric toothbrush, but it is not necessary for everyone to have in order to maintain good oral health. Electric toothbrushes greatly benefit people with Parkinson’s Disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis, or other such conditions that could impair one’s ability to hold and maneuver a toothbrush. Spinning and vibrating (and whirling and twirling) bristles are really great at restoring one’s manual dexterity when it has been lost. However, if you do not have any existing conditions that impair movement, then there is likely no need for an electric toothbrush at all.

The Debtist

AN ELECTRIC TOOTHBRUSH DOES HAVE ITS LIMITATIONS

An electric toothbrush is useful because you’ve got this machine that moves in certain directions to remove the sticky plaque building up on your teeth, but it does have its limitations. Usually, the direction that a toothbrush head spins or vibrates is singular. With manual toothbrushes, you can vary the direction of your brushing at any time, which can be more effective. For example, if your teeth are slightly crooked, an electric toothbrush that only spins in a clockwise direction may miss a particular spot that a manual toothbrush can reach by moving side to side, or up and down. Depending on where the tight corners in your particular dentition are, you can alter the same toothbrush to move different ways in order to reach very difficult areas. Also, the electric brushes are very strong, which some people are not aware of. Using them requires an even softer hand than using a manual brush. Even though the intentions are good, pushing down on an electric toothbrush can cause too much trauma on the gums, causing gum recession. We like gums as much as teeth, so this is no good. Therefore, using an electric toothbrush may seem easier, but easier does not always mean better.

THE TRUTH: MOST PEOPLE WOULD DO JUST FINE WITH A MANUAL TOOTHBRUSH

The truth of the matter is, most people would do just fine with a manual toothbrush. I understand that it takes some time (and practice) to learn how to use a manual toothbrush, but the same is true of anything else in your life. Once mastered, the chore becomes a habit, and habits are subconscious and therefore become easy. If you can put in the time and effort to learn how to use a toothbrush effectively, then a manual toothbrush would work equally as well as an electric toothbrush! But, if you do not want to put in the effort to learn how to properly yield a manual toothbrush, then yes, you can buy a gadget and it can do the work for you. It makes sense that the results of inefficient manual toothbrush techniques will be subpar with the results of a vibrating electric device. However, what most people do not understand is that learning how to brush really well can yield results that are as good, and sometimes even better, than your new gadget.

WHY I CHOOSE TO USE A MANUAL TOOTHBRUSH

On that note, most patients are surprised to learn that I myself choose to use solely manual toothbrushes. There are many reasons why I opt for the manual brushes. As an advocate of slower-living, a lover of nature and sustainable products, and a fan-girl of the lost art of doing things for ourselves, I am partial towards tooth brushing by hand. Manual toothbrushes give us sustainable product options that are more eco-friendly than their plastic vibrating counterparts. We have manual brushes on the market that are biodegradable, recyclable, or recycled themselves. It allows me to pick a product that is in line with my values and my intention of creating less waste. Additionally, I have more control with a manual toothbrush. I can move the bristles in directions that are good for my particular dentition and I can alter the pressures that I place on my gums a bit easier. And lastly, I find them to be much more cost-effective. My persona as the Debtist easily explains why cost-efficiency is important for me. From a dentist’s perspective, I understand that we can do just as well with a manual as we can with an electric one.

While electric toothbrushes do have their uses and are a huge help to those who need it, I believe we have gotten to a point where they may be a bit over-hyped (and possibly over-sold) for the sake of convenience. It’s an easy answer to the question, “How do I brush my teeth well?” Instead of teaching people to be better brushers, we are making them dependent on a tool to do the work for them, and the cost is more plastic being introduced into our environment at ever-increasing price as less and less people learn how to effectively brush. I tell patients all the time that we are responsible for our oral health, and we shouldn’t depend solely on spinning brush wheels. We need to take our oral health back into our own hands. Quite literally. And with that, the battle of the brushes continue.

Tooth Brushing Techniques With Bogobrush

This post is sponsored by Bogobrush, a source for ethically made, sustainable toothbrushes, with a one-for-one give-back program for low-income communities. 

We all know that prevention is better than treatment when it comes to the dental office. There are many ways to prevent caries formation and periodontal disease, the most common of which are proper oral hygiene at home and consistent visits to the dentist for dental check-ups and cleanings. Off course, there are many tools one can use to implement oral hygiene at home. However, the tools are not as important as the methods with which we carry out our everyday oral hygiene. Hence, this short discussion on tooth brushing techniques.

People always see me at the dental office and ask me, “Hey Doc, do I need an electric toothbrush?” Well, that depends. Are you physically capable of brushing your teeth? If you are without Parkinson’s or Rheumatoid Arthritis, or other such conditions that could impair your ability to hold and maneuver a toothbrush, then I would venture that you do not need an electric toothbrush. Now, if the question you meant to ask was, “Could I benefit from an electric toothbrush?”, well, that depends too. If you put in the minimal time and effort to learn how to use a toothbrush effectively, then a manual toothbrush would work equally as well as an electric toothbrush. If you do not want to put in the effort to learn how to properly yield a manual toothbrush, then yes, you can buy a gadget that can do the work for you. It makes sense that the results of inefficient manual toothbrush techniques will be subpar with the results of a vibrating electric toothbrush. However, what most people do not understand is that the results of an efficient manual toothbrush can be as good, and sometimes even better, than your new gadget.

So, in an effort to save you some money, and to save the planet from unnecessary plastic devices, I am going to discuss tooth brushing techniques using my favorite, eco-friendly, socially-conscious Bogobrush.

How to hold your toothbrush.

Most people brush too hard. The point is not to be vigorous with brushing. I know that your intentions are good, and you are making all efforts to remove the plaque from your teeth as best as you can, but excessive forces while brushing can lead to recession of the gums, which can then unleash another set of problems such as teeth sensitivity. Dentists love gums as much as teeth, so we definitely do not want to do that! The root of the problem is usually in the way a person holds their toothbrush. Usually, I see people enclosing their entire fists around the handle, which increases the pressure they can exert on the gum tissue. Unfortunately, this is WAY too much pressure. You want to hold your toothbrush like a flute. Four fingers on the top and the thumb on the bottom. You will notice the vast difference in pressure, and your gums will be all the more happier about it.

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Tooth Brushing Techniques

There are multiple tooth brushing techniques! Some are good, some not so good, and some are entirely bad. The methods that I will discuss today are the Bass Method, Stillman Method, and Charter’s Method, the names of which are completely unimportant, but the techniques of which are instrumental. All three methods can be modified, which will also be discussed here. Lastly, there are a few subpar methods called the Fones Method and the Roll-Stroke Brushing technique, which could be useful in teaching children elementary brushing techniques, however, they are not entirely effective in plaque removal and require graduation from once the individual is capable. But first…

How NOT to Brush Your Teeth: The Horizontal Method

A lot of people brush their teeth in horizontal fashion. Meaning they move the toothbrush left to right, from the posterior teeth to the anterior teeth, back and forth over and over again. Typically the toothbrush is pointed directly at the teeth, without ever touching the gums, which is the first negative part about this technique. Plaque will tend to accumulate near the gum line, so we definitely want to focus in this area. However, it’s just as bad if the horizontal method was carried out while pointing the toothbrush at the gums. This method is one of the leading causes of abrasion lesions. This means that the back and forth motion scrapes away at the gums and causes recession of the gum tissue. And as we said earlier, we want nice healthy gums to be covering the roots of our teeth. In the past, this is the tooth brushing method that was taught, so I hardly blame anyone who still believes that this is the optimal technique. But my dear friends, times have changed. Hand in hand with the idea of brushing your teeth as hard as you can, we now know that this is not the ideal way to brush teeth.

Good Brushing Techniques:

So how DO we want to brush our teeth? Below are three methods of teeth brushing. The three methods may seem very similar, and a mixture of these techniques may be used. The one unifying link between these brushing techniques that I think is an important take-away is the fact that the toothbrush is angled towards the gum line at a 45 degree angle, always!

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  1. The Bass Technique

This is my favorite brushing technique and it is actually one of the most effective because of its ability to remove plaque underneath your gum line, which then helps prevent periodontal infection.

Method: Point the toothbrush towards your gum line (where your tooth and your gums meet) at a 45 degree angle.  Gently put enough pressure so that the bristles of the toothbrush enter the gingival sulcus, otherwise known as the space between the tooth and the gums. Create a vibrational movement using very very short back and forth strokes. You need to do 10-15 strokes per tooth (which is essentially what you pay an electric toothbrush to do for you). The important part is to do this vibrational motion without removing the bristles from the sulcus. After 10-15 strokes, you can move to the next tooth.

  1. The Stillman Technique

Method: This is very similar to bass technique with a slight modification. You will still point the bristles at a 45 degree angle towards the gum and place similar pressure. As you vibrate the toothbrush using short strokes, you move the toothbrush towards the occlusal surface (otherwise known as the top of the tooth). So in essence, you start at the gum line and move towards the tops of your teeth, while moving in this vibrating motion!

  1. The Charter’s Technique

Lastly, the Charter’s technique is used when there is an appliance in the mouth, such as braces!

Method: Think of the Charter’s technique as an inverted version of the Bass Technique. Instead of the toothbrush pointing at the gums, we want the toothbrush bristles to be pointing towards the occlusal surface of the tooth (or top of the tooth). The sides of the bristles should then be pushed up alongside the gums. The toothbrush should still be at a 45 degree angle. Vibrational movements are still used to remove the plaque.

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  1. Modified Versions of Techniques 1-3

The modified versions of all three techniques can be made, wherein one rolls the toothbrush towards the occlusal surface (or tops of the teeth) at the end of each vibrational sequence (Remember, 10-15 vibrational strokes per tooth!).

Brushing Techniques for the Young Learner

  1. Fones Technique

This technique is one of the subpar techniques that can be used to LEARN how to brush, in a very elementary sense, but is not extremely efficient in removing plaque. We teach this technique to children who are just learning how to brush their teeth.

Method: This technique is known as the circular brushing method. A toothbrush is placed on a set of teeth and is moved in a circular fashion a few times, before moving to the next set of teeth. It is important to understand that this method is only meant to be used to introduce people to brushing techniques.

2. Roll Stroke Brushing Technique

Similar to the Fones Technique, this technique is also subpar, but is simple and requires little practice, so it is usually used as an introduction to tooth brushing.

Method: Place the toothbrush towards the gums and swipe towards the occlusal surface of the tooth (the top of the tooth). Continue this movement until all teeth have been brushed.

Common spots you don’t want to miss!

It’s easy to forget about the backs of your teeth, but those are equally important as well. The back of your front teeth are where plaque and calculus tend to accumulate for most people, mostly because this area is so easily forgotten. Brushing the backs of anterior teeth can be very difficult, so here are some images to show how you can achieve the 45 degree angle in such a funky spot. Uncomfortable at first, but like everything else, it’ll fall right into “normal” after a few practice runs. Disclaimer: you have to brush the backs of anterior teeth with an electric toothbrush too!

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So there we have it! Tooth brushing techniques that will save you from needing an electric toothbrush, and the planet from unnecessary plastic.

To learn more about Bogobrush, check out a previous post here.

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Fun Fact: On average, a person should be replacing their toothbrush every 3-4 months. Once the bristles are splayed out, they are less efficient at removing plaque. Conveniently, Bogobrush has a subscription option that will automatically send your next toothbrush at a monthly interval of your choosing. Bogobrush is currently offering TheDebtist readers their first subscription for free.

As always, thank you for supporting those that support TheDebtist.