Finances: Using “Extra” Loan Money on Vacation Was a Financial Mistake

Right on the heels of my previous post is a suggestion for all current college students to avoid taking out the maximum student loans in order to travel the world. Lest anyone got the wrong idea, I think a follow up is necessary to shed light on the fact that I used borrowed money to pay for my portion of that trip to the Bahamas. More blatantly, I made a mistake, and learned from it, albeit a little too late.

By no means do I regret travelling, ever. There’s a lot to glean from expanding horizons and investing in your world view. You learn things about other people and other places, as much as your own home and yourself, that you will never learn in a classroom. And I paid an arm and a leg for a classroom. So it’s worth paying to travel. But it’s NOT worth spending borrowed money, which equates to borrowed time.

In your early twenties, it seems like a wonderful idea and the repercussions are not so easily visible. For the first time, you have the ability to have access to “extra” money, and the calling to reward yourself during seasonal breaks is all too strong to resist, but resist you must.

I was advised to take out my maximum student loans from the get go. You know, just in case. As in, just in case I find something else to spend that money on. Which, for a young twenty-something, isn’t entirely too difficult to do. I was told that once I was a dentist, I would have no problem paying it back. The premise was that I would be making so much money that it would be easy to get rid of that debt quite quickly. So worry about it later. What appeared odd to me was that when I got close to graduating, I kept being fed this “worry about it later” mantra. I was told I could (and should) put loans on the back burner for another twenty five years under a loan forgiveness program. Because by then, I’d be like, a millionaire or something, and it’d be suuuper easy to pay it back, surely. Which is the same reasoning they fed me when I started dental school. It was then that I woke up, and realized that all people are saying are “worry about it later.” I started worrying about it NOW and when I did, I realized that I was sold a lie.

Unfortunately, the realization hit me a bit too late. Towards the end of dental school, I had accumulated “extra” money, read as extra loan money. We took that trip to the Bahamas, and I wanted to pay my share for the trip. You know, with my “extra” money. I’d call myself a downright fool for ever thinking that borrowed money is money worth spending. Especially on frivolities such as trips. As a young twenty-something, I still did not have a full grip on the daunting largeness of my student loans. What difference does a few extra thousand make? Well, glad you asked (because I surely did not)!

Warning: The example below is not as hypothetical as it seems. 

Assuming you take a $550,000 loan out, but towards the end of your schooling, you had an extra $5,000 left. You decide to take an international trip and reward yourself for all your hard work. So instead of using that extra $5000 to decrease your loan to $545,000, you keep your loan at the maximum $550,000. If you decide to do a 10 year standard repayment plan such as I did, the difference after ten years is about $7,000. Which means that instead of a $5,000 trip, it was actually a $7,000 trip. That’s a 40% increase from what you thought the trip originally cost, assuming no inflation occurs in ten years (unlikely).

For those unconvinced, they ask, what does a difference of $7,000 make in a loan so large? The literal answer is slightly over a month of loan repayment. But the non-visible answer is hundreds of patients, hours of static postures, tens of times recharging your loupe lights, and more than a few times that your back aches, your eyes become strained, your fingers cramp, and you come across a stressful situation. It’s a month of your life spent earning an income and getting nothing out of it. Well, except a trip that you took in your twenties. So the real question is, how much do you value a month of your life?

The answer depends on what camp you fall under: YOLO or JOMO. If you fall under YOLO, then yes, maybe the trade off isn’t so bad. If you fall under JOMO, then the outcome isn’t so good. For the record, I did not regret that trip. I just regret the resources I used to get there. But hey, at least it wasn’t an engagement ring!

For those interested in traveling while in school, might you try travel hacking instead?

Finance: Why I Consider the Loan Forgiveness Program as a Risky Chance

When you graduate with a loan as large as I have ($550,000 in debt!), it is easy to view student loan forgiveness programs as the superheroes of our lives. There are many different loan forgiveness options that you must choose from, but once you’ve chosen one, you are given the choice of paying a sliver of your income every month, with the promise that at the end of your program, the remaining (accruing) balance will be wiped forever from your life! It’s an ultimate quick fix to a problematic giant standing in the way of your financial independence. The small monthly payments are on autopay and the looming terror is out of sight, out of mind, for the next twenty or twenty five years. So why the skepticism?

Twenty five years is an extremely long time. I know, because I have barely passed my twenty five year mark. I also know that because after I add on twenty five years, I’d be over fifty. To be honest with you, I don’t want to keep this lifestyle up until I’m fifty. A lot can happen in twenty five years. The immediate assumption is that no matter what happens in the future, we will be grand-fathered in this loan forgiveness program.  But although it’s an immediate assumption, it doesn’t mean it’s logical or true. Because nowhere in the fine print does it say that. But our brains are wired to make up stuff that will put us at ease. And so, some like to reason that this must be true, and I know I can’t convince them otherwise. Because, what do I know?

Well, here is what I know.

  • I know that there are people out there who chose a ten year loan forgiveness program. Only to be told after their ten years that they do not or no longer qualify. Some haughty know-it-all will likely say, “Well, that’s THEIR fault for not knowing their own program!” But as we all know, they don’t make programs easy to know. The fine print just keeps getting smaller AND longer.
  • I know that my sister took a five year contract with a charter school in a city far away from her family and friends with the promise of getting $40,000 forgiven from her student debt after the five years. However, you cannot apply for the forgiveness until you’ve completed all five years. Last year, the amount forgiven changed. It went down to $17,000. Still a good amount, but not the promised $40,000. Her five years ends in June. So in June, she would have given up five years of her life living in this far away city to only get back less than half of what she thought she was going to get back. Which is depressing to think about, since she turned down multiple amazing opportunities with higher pay for this program.
  • I know that in the ONE year that I have been out of dental school, there has already been talk of the loan forgiveness program being extended to THIRTY years. An additional five years of minimum payments, a continually accruing debt, and a higher percentage of your loan that you have to pay in taxes at the end of it all. More, more, more.

Therefore, you are right in saying that I just don’t know. I don’t know the future one year from now, so I sure as heck don’t know the future twenty five years from now. I don’t know who will be in the government, who will be controlling our laws, how the program will change, if the program will still apply to me, and if the program will even exist. And with a loan this large, I will not leave this up to chance.

What I do know is that I CAN tackle this giant, so I WILL. I will not let him rule over me, stop me in my path, instill any fears or doubts.

Will you tackle him, too?

 

Finance: The First Year of Paying Down $550,000 in Student Loans, An Update

Hi guys! So it has been about a year since our search for a future home turned into a commitment to pay down my massive student debt instead. I figured I would give you an update as to what paying down $550,000 at 6.7% interest looks like.

We arrived at our decision to tackle the loans aggressively in April of 2017 (our decision tree, here). The most important thing to note with a loan this large is that committing to it means REALLY committing to it. It wouldn’t be advantageous to choose to pay down the debt, and then fall back to IBR midway. From a numbers perspective, you would just lose unnecessary money that way. If you choose the loan forgiveness route, then the goal is to pay AS LITTLE MONTHLY PAYMENTS AS POSSIBLE, so that a huge chunk gets written off. If you choose the standard repayment option, then the goal is to pay AS MUCH MONEY AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. So, with a steely grip on the reality that we did not want the debt to dictate and shape our lives for twenty five years, we went head first.

Here are the numbers.

To be completely honest with you, $550,000 is a ballpark estimate. The real number is a principle amount of $538,933.50 and an accrued interest of $35,101. Meaning the total was actually $574,034.50. YIKES!

So what did we do? We decided that we will essentially live off of one income, and use the other income towards loans. We figure, out parents raised us on a single person’s income, so this can’t be that difficult especially since we don’t even have kids yet. The verdict: We were right! It was surprisingly easy. Which makes me wonder, where were we spending all that money before hand?! I don’t even want to know….

With that being said, we have been successful at making our minimum payments of $6500 per month! YAY! We were even able to add a little extra every so often due to diligent saving habits (See The Ever Growing List of Things I’ve Given Up In The Name of Frugality!). But that does not take us as far on the path of financial freedom as we would like. It took us a few months to completely pay off the interest that had accrued, but it must be remembered that the loan is at 6.7% interest. So that means that interest continues to accrue over all this time. So what does that look like? Well, once the accrued interest was paid off, approximately half of the $6,500 was going towards the interest accruing per month. Which means that the loan is only getting paid down at a rate of about $3,000 per month. And that, my friends, is how lovely interest works! Womp, womp.

So, $55,367.22 was paid towards interest. Only $28,632.78 went towards paying down the principle amount. When my husband first looked at the little pie chart graph that I hard on the corner of my computer screen summarizing our progress, he said, “Well, THAT’s depressing!” For someone who is only looking at that, it CAN seem pretty depressing. However, I know better. This. Is. Amazing.

The accrued interest is already out of the way, which tells me that next year is going to look a LOT better. I can already see a higher proportion of the monthly payments being applied to our principle. It started out as slightly less than half of our payment being applied to the principle. However, as of early this year, slightly more than half is being applied to principle. I know it’s hard to look at this as any way other than a linear projection, but it really, truly is an exponential one, albeit with a slow start.

The amazing part is that we have survived our first year and our lives have actually been much improved. Choosing this journey has nudged us to be proactive with our life, not only with our financial decisions, but also with our lifestyle choices. We are experiencing less stress than when we felt helpless and unable to address the student loans. We are experiencing more happiness than when we were trying to buy our way to a meaningful life. I work less than I did last year, and love myself more. We are healthier and have better relationships. And it all started with us learning how to get our finances in order and in our efforts to remove money from our life equation.

I am very happy with this decision and I am excited to see what the next year of payments will bring.

PS: I am excited that we will hit the $400,000’s during me and Mike’s birthday months in June/July!

Also, for the curious, I have never, not once, felt regret in funneling extra money towards my student loans. I have felt buyer’s remorse. I’ve regretted going out to eat. I have regretted going to events that required spending money. I have regretted buying gifts that I know will end up in a landfill some day. But I have never regretted letting go of money in exchange for a little slice of freedom. I’m just saying.

Finance: Why We Chose Standard Repayment Over Loan Forgiveness

We started our loan repayment journey under the IBR program, as advised by so many professionals. But I always knew in my heart that this was not the best path for me. Apart from the fact that IBR resulted in more money paid towards my loans overall, there was the issue of it extending twenty five years into our distant future. I am one who values freedom above many other things. When I was young, I hated when people told me to do things that did not line up with my values. My most hated explanations were “Just because” or “Because I said so”. Talk about lack of motivation. I despised myself when I was forced to do something, because authoritative figures claimed to have the upper hand. I remember thinking to myself, when I get older, I will have control over my own life. Today, I have that same fire feeding a resolve in me to stay free, from things financial or otherwise. I want freedom to do certain types of work. I want freedom from a tight work schedule. I want autonomy in my decisions. I want the freedom to travel whenever I want to. I want to have free time. All of this also requires to be financially free. Having graduated dental school at 26 years old, the IBR program would mean that we would have this burden hanging over our heads until we were past 50 years old. Psychologically, the burden was too much to bear. It was the psychology of the thing that really pushed me towards frugality, financial independence, and hopefully in the near(er) future, freedom.

When I graduated dental school and I finally started working, Mike and I were facing numerous large payments related to moving in together, creating a home for ourselves, getting married, and going on a honeymoon. And while I would not take back any of the decisions we made, we weren’t exactly saving much at the time. The great part is, we weren’t going into debt either. Whereas some people may take out loans for things such as weddings and honeymoons and moving, we definitely stayed within our means and I am proud of that fact.

But once the dust settled and we found peace in our space and identified our roles in everyday life, we stopped having something to spend money on, and we started to see that we were not bad savers after all. In fact, we were saving at such a quick pace, that we would have saved up for a down payment for a house in two months’ time! We started to talk about buying a home for ourselves, when our financial planner asked us a simple question. Do you realize that at this rate, you can pay down your student debt the standard way in less than ten years?

At first, I was aghast. I had spent months trying to convince USC financial advisers, and Mike, and even my financial planner, that there had to be a way to do this. Mike deemed my conclusions as too optimistic, and slightly delusional. He always said, the numbers just don’t work. But in my head, they did work. The numbers don’t lie.

I then went on to bombard our CFP with a million questions. Excited, I could not wait to tell Mike when he got home that night. I remember being so stoked. Initially, he did not believe me. It wasn’t until our financial planner created a spreadsheet that demonstrated our capability to conquer the loan in 9 years, that Mike started to change his view. We were going to be free from these chains fifteen years earlier than we thought!

But with it comes a cost. We will have to give up buying a house, for now. We have to continue a fairly frugal lifestyle, and have concrete intentionality with our money. We have to be able to psychologically see a majority of our paycheck going towards paying down the loans every month. We have to give up the social status symbols that our friends will be collecting under their belts. In exchange, we will have fifteen additional years of freedom. What say you?

I say Hell Yeah! Mike and I are simple people anyway, as can be seen in the rate at which we were saving. We could rationalize not buying a house, not buying a new car, and not getting the latest gadgets. I could not rationalize being tied down by my career choice until I’m past fifty. We decided that yes, we will choose standard repayment over loan forgiveness!

One caveat. We are still enlisted under the IBR program. Why? Under the standard repayment plan, we have to make minimum payments of $6500/month to be able to pay the debt in 9 years. Under IBR, the payments are closer to $400/month. If one of us loses a job, $6500/month is impossible on only one of our incomes. Especially so if I was the one to lose a job. Switching a hundred percent to standard repayment will make us vulnerable to the whims of whatever life may throw at us. The failure of Mike’s start-up company, the selling of the practice I work at, if we decide to have children, disability for either one of us, these are all things that can greatly impact our finances and if we commit to a standard repayment, it can heavily mess with our ability to pay the loans. And trust me, you do not want to default on student loans. However, under IBR, we are able to pay more than the $400/month without penalty, so we stick with IBR in case of a future emergency, but continue to make the larger payments.

Unfortunately, this does not allow us to refinance our loans. Once the loans are refinanced, we become ineligible for IBR. So although the IBR interest rate is a whopping 6.7%, our financial planner convinced us that the IBR buffer for not-so-awesome life moments is well worth the extra interest rate. Once the loans get paid down to a more manageable sum, then we can refinance, since a smaller loan will be much more manageable.

So therein lies our decision tree, our little story.

Finance: When NOT to consolidate student loans

There was a day last year when Mike, two co-workers, and I all took the day off of work, just because. I remember it vividly. It was a Tuesday and the weather was sunny, and somewhere in the low eighties. Mike and his co-workers came over to our place to work one of his motorcycles. The goal was to change the engine, but I think the boys really just wanted to take it apart and put it back together like a box of legos. Such are the interests of engineers who design electric cars all day. I did my own thing, cooking and writing, and biking, etc. The usual. Once in a while, I popped my head in the garage to watch them tinker, to observe the progress. There were times where they struggled, muscling their way into making pieces fit. Other times, they laughed, at some overlooked rookie mistake of theirs. Most of the time they were either marveling at the mechanics of it all, or otherwise criticizing some faulty housing of electric wires. I guess inefficiencies of mechanical parts are laughable, to some. Overall, they did good. The bike ran, after twelve hours of work, sweat, and metaphorical tears.

At the end of the day, we ate a much deserved dinner of Mediterranean food. As we were talking about who knows what, the topic of student loans came up. It was actually brought up by one of Mike’s co-workers who happened to be dating a pharmacist. He was the one who inspired me to write the previous blog post, and it is because of stories like these that I am determined to share whatever little knowledge I have of finances with the rest of the world.

His girlfriend was pursuing an alternative loan forgiveness program to pay her student loans from pharmacy school. As part of the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program, she has been working for the past two years at a VA hospital in LA county. The program states that after ten years of service at a government or not-for-profit organization, the loans will be wiped, TAX FREE (compared to the IBR, PAYE and REPAYE options which considers forgiven amounts as part of your income and is therefore taxed). She has been working here for a few years and was warned against consolidating her loans by her co-workers. Why?

She had some co-workers who have been working at the hospital for a few years. The hospital started to convince them to consolidate their loans. They said consolidating multiple loans into one will be more convenient and easier to track. Some of them went ahead and did just that, after listening to the hospital’s advice. Unfortunately, there is a clause that states that after consolidation of student loans, previous payments do not count towards the loan repayment program. In other words, despite having worked for 2 out of the required 10 years, after consolidation of the loans, the previous 2 years no longer counted towards the 10 year loan repayment. The consolidated loan is now considered a completely different loan, and in order to have that loan forgiven, they will have to work for an additional ten years. It was a story enough to make one cry. Imagine working your way towards freedom, only to have that freedom taken away and prolonged. The past two years of hard work went towards nothing. The worst part? They were advised to do this! Off course, it is not the hospital’s responsibility to be aware of the clauses associated with every loan program, so we can’t entirely blame the hospital. I just wish there was a positive end result from the decision to consolidate, which there wasn’t. All for “convenience” of having one lump sum, instead of keeping track of a few different loans.

Moral of the story: Do not consolidate your loans if you have already started a Public Service Loan Forgiveness program. If you would like to consolidate your loans, please do this right out of school, prior to working for your not-for-profit or government organization. My heart seriously goes out to those who have discovered this clause the difficult way. I am just glad that our friend’s girlfriend learned of it before she herself was convinced to do the same.

In line with all other aspects of this blog, freedom supersedes convenience in my book, always. Freedom to call your own schedule. Freedom to take the day off with your friends whenever you want. Freedom to enjoy hobbies, learn new things, and work on motorcycles. Even if it means avoiding the conveniences. 

Finance: Student Loan Forgiveness Options: IBR VS PAYE VS REPAYE

I remember the days leading up to graduating dental school. I had an incurable case of senioritis, and I was ready to go. I had reached all my requirements with a few months to spare. It was just a matter of time. It wasn’t school itself that was on my mind. All I could think about at that point was the student debt that I knew I had to face once I got out.

I recall that every student at USC’s dental program was required to take an exit course that went over student loan repayment options. They called it a course to make it sound official, but it was literally a one hour power-point presentation in a small classroom with mostly empty seats. I remember sitting towards the front of the classroom, with a notepad and pen, and furiously scribbling notes throughout the entire thing. Meanwhile, classmates grumbled about what a waste of time this was. Some tardily strolled in, halfway through the presentation, just so they can sign the sign out sheets. Those that did come on time sat, and politely listened, but without a pen in hand, sitting back casually until the presenter announced the end. At that time, I thought that I was the only one who did not understand this stuff. It seemed like either everyone either had rich parents, or had a plan. I remember kicking myself for not studying this before, since my classmates appeared bored at best, presumably because they already knew the ins and outs of their loan repayment plans. There was only one other classmate, a boy, who was taking notes with me. I remember him vividly, though we never talked before, because he asked tons of questions that I was too afraid to ask. I also remember him because after the class, the speaker offered to do additional mini-lectures if we had questions. He was the only other person I saw pursue this topic as avidly as I in the upcoming weeks before graduation. I would come in for a one-on-one meeting with the financial advisor, and after I walked out, he would walk in. Or vice versa. We had meetings with the malpractice representative twice, and for disability insurance once more, after the required one. We were the only two students in the classroom during these meetings. He and I sat next to each other at the front of the room, taking notes and writing down numbers and calculations. I must have seen him on 7 different days outside of the required exit course. I never spoke to him, not once. I don’t even remember his name, although we were in the same class. I wish I did so I can hit him up and ask how his path to repayment is going. Meanwhile, I thought everyone else had it all figured out. But I was wrong.

I was so obsessed (afraid? aware?) of the student debt’s debilitating ability to control my life that I even had Mike sit in on some of the meetings. This was around the time we had talked about getting married, and I realized that now my decisions will start to affect someone that I cared about. I wanted him to a) know what he was getting into because once you’re married, you share EVERYTHING and b) not be extremely affected by the loan I was bringing in. I felt a lot of guilt, and it was the first time in my life that I realized that my misguided financial choices will impact a loved one’s lifestyle for a long period of time. I knew I had to get out. I went through projections and extrapolations and Excel sheets with counselors. Then I scheduled an appointment with Mike in order to go over the same spreadsheets and Excel sheets again (because they won’t allow you to take a copy of the real numbers home…). We are numbers people, and I had to have him see the numbers. I remember coming home to late night discussions about our “game plan”. I remember feeling trapped, and slightly depressed, that I could not find a short term solution for this. I got out of dental school and picked up just about every possible side hustle I could muster while waiting for my license in the mail. Before I even started work, I reached out to a CFP because I felt that I needed help. I didn’t know the ins and outs of finances as well as I would hope, and I wanted to make sure that we were doing everything correctly. The one thing I did know was that the only thing on our side was time. The sooner I addressed my financial problems, the less of a burden they will be in the future. I wanted to cut off all compounding problems (read as interests), nip them in the bud persay, before the weeds could grow thorns.

Throughout this entire process, all anyone would say (when I was bold enough to ask them about their repayment plan) was that they were going with the student loan repayment route. In parrot-like manner, almost. Surely, when the exit course was being taught at USC, it was implied that the student loan repayment plan is the way to go. It was the YOLOs of all YOLOs. You only pay a small percentage of your paycheck, for 20-25 years, and then your loan is forgiven after that. Have fun now, enjoy life while you are young, and worry about the debt later. I always felt in my heart that that could not have been the best option. But everyone I talked to at the beginning of our journey said that my loan was too large to realistically pay down the debt in a standard way, unless I was some baller G who landed a five star practice that I owned for myself. I mean, I understand why. A standard repayment required a $6000 check being sent to My Great Lakes, every month for 10 years. That is 120 consecutive payments of $6000. It’s a huge pill to swallow. Mike didn’t believe we could do it given the numbers. Even my financial planner, who first looked at our finances in September, said that it can’t be done according to our current financial situation. (Eventually, we did get to a point where it could be done, but I will save that for a future post). So at the beginning of our journey, everyone we consulted with said we had to choose between the following three student loan repayment options: IBR, PAYE, or REPAYE.

I chose one and then entered the real world, where I learned, that most people who graduated from college did not even have an exit course and have absolutely no idea what they are doing with their student loans. I have talked to numerous professionals, and there has been many instances where they asked a question regarding a fundamental aspect of their loan program because they just didn’t have the answer. I have dentists who have been out 3, 5, 10 years, asking me questions about loans. I am no expert at this stuff, just to clarify, but I did study it for a fair amount of time. I have been thinking about writing this post for a while, but it wasn’t until Mike’s co-worker was talking to Mike one day and said, “You know what Sam should write about on her blog? All the Student Loan Forgiveness options and their clauses. Because no one seems to understand this shit.” His girlfriend is a pharmacist working for the past two years under a Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program, and she says her colleagues have made some major mistakes that have screwed their financial plan significantly. More on that at a later post as well. The take away message here is that, maybe no one actually knew what they were doing as the graduating days neared us. I sure didn’t. I was so unsure about my options that I felt the need to hire a financial planner just to get things straight. Maybe no one still knows. And when it was outwardly voiced that there is a need for this post, then that’s what motivated me to sit down and write it. Additionally, I will walk you through our decision tree, to give you some insight as to why one of these was the option we chose. Please understand that our decision tree does not necessarily predict your own decision tree. It is only meant to show the thought process through which we reached a final decision.

When we went through the student loan exit course, there were numerous slides on that PowerPoint that, in my opinion, were haphazardly organized. As a visual person, here is the best way I could organize this information. There are three options currently, IBR, PAYE, and REPAYE. The following are the differences between the three programs.

IBR VS PAYE VS REPAYE

  IBR PAYE REPAYE
Eligible Loans -All federal Family Education Loan Program, Stafford and Grad Plus Loans

-All FFELP and direct loan consolidation loans that do not contain parent PLUS Loans

-All Stafford loans or Grad Plus Loans disbursed on or after October 1, 2011.
-Consolidation loans made on or after October 1, 2011, unless they contain a direct loan or FFEL loan made before October 1, 2007, or a Parent PLUS loan.

-Direct loan borrowers without loans prior to October 1, 2007 who also had a disbursement made on or after October 1, 2011.

-Any Stafford/Grad Plus Loan

-Any direct consolidation loan that does not contain Parent PLUS loan.

Eligibility -Payments under a 10 year term must be higher than what they would be under IBR. -Payments under a 10-year term must be higher than what they would be under REPAYE. -No payment amount limit.
Monthly Payment 15% of discretionary income. The maximum is what you’d pay under a 10 year loan. 10% of discretionary income. 10% of discretionary income.
Married Borrowers -If filing joint tax returns, both spouses’ incomes and eligible debt is considered.

-If filing separate tax returns, only the applicant’s income and eligible debt is considered.

– If filing joint tax returns, both spouses’ incomes and eligible debt is considered.

-If filing separate tax returns, only the applicant’s income and eligible debt is considered.

– Both spouses’ income and federal student loan debt, if applicable, is considered regardless of filing status.

-Exception for victims of domestic violence or if borrower is separated from spouse.

Interest Capitalization When calculated, payment is equal to or greater than what it would be under the 10 year term and/or when the borrower leaves IBR. When calculated, payment is equal to or greater than what it would be under the 10 year term and/or when the borrower leaves PAYE. As there is no maximum payment, interest will only be capitalized once they leave REPAYE.
Forgiveness Any remaining balance after 25 years of eligible payments is forgiven and taxed as income. Only payments made on or after July 1, 2009 are eligible. Any remaining balance after 20 years of eligible payments is forgiven and taxed as income. Only payments made on or after July 1, 2009 are eligible. Borrowers with undergrad loans only will receive forgiveness after 20 years of eligible payments. Those with graduate loans will receive forgiveness after 25 years of eligible payments. Forgiven amount will be taxed as income.

THE SIMILARITIES

The following are requirements that apply to all three loan forgiveness options:

  • Discretionary income is adjusted gross income minus 150% of state poverty level for the borrower’s family size.
  • Loans cannot be in default.
  • Minimum monthly payments can be as low as $0 per month. For example, if you are currently not working due to disability or maternity leave, you pay a percentage of your income, which is $0.
  • If payment does not satisfy monthly accrued interest, the Department of Education pays the remained for most subsidized Stafford loans for up to 3 years. For REPAYE only, the agency also will pay 50% of unpaid interest on unsubsidized loans.
  • Like IBR/REPAYE, payments under REPAYE count toward public service loan forgiveness. If your loan is under FFEL program, you need to consolidate in order to get REPAYE.

INSIGHTS

  • No Parent PLUS Loans: First thing is first. You’ve got to figure out which student loans you’ve taken out. Once you have that figured out, you can decide which loan repayment programs you qualify for. It is important to note that none of these loan forgiveness programs allow Parent PLUS loans. If you are going to consolidate your loans, you have to make sure that none of the loans that were consolidated are part of a Parent PLUS loan, otherwise, you immediately disqualify yourself from the loan forgiveness programs.
  • October 1, 2011 is the cut off for PAYE. If you have taken out loans prior to this date, you will not qualify for PAYE.
  • Payments under a 10-year term must be higher than what they would be under IBR. But does it makes sense to do IBR? This is important if your loan amount is quite small. For example, if you have a loan of $150,000 (let’s say because you worked your butt off to minimize the student loan total) and you make $135,000/year as a dentist, a 10 year repayment plan will have you paying $1718.52/month at a 6.7% interest rate for 10 years. Compare that to IBR where you pay $1687.50/month at the same interest rate for 25 years. Technically, in this example, you will still qualify for IBR, because your 10-year term payments are still higher than IBR payments. But is it worth it? To me, it would make sense to just stick with standard repayment and get rid of the debt in 10 years, rather than prolonging it for 25 years, especially since you pay about the same monthly payment. The shortened debt time will decrease the total money you end up paying, because it decreases the amount you pay in interest. Plus, you will no longer have the debt hanging over your head. Compare that to a dentist who makes the same amount of money per year, but who has a loan debt of $550,000. Now the month difference is $6500/month vs $1687.50/month. IBR works well if you have a huge loan and cannot make the atrocious monthly payment fit with your ideal lifestyle. For smaller loan amounts, it may be best to just stick with standard repayment.
  • Smaller monthly payments: A good thing or a bad thing? When looking at these programs with a short term mindset, it is easy to think that smaller monthly payments are better than larger monthly payments. However, may I point out that small monthly payments for a large loan may not be enough to pay down the interest at all. For example, with a loan of $550,000, the interest that accrues each month at 6.7% interest rate is about $3,200/month. However, as from the previous example, 15% of a $135,000 yearly gross income is $1687. So every month, you are only paying half of the accruing interest, which means that interest will continually add to your loan total. Over twenty five years, you are increasing your total amount under the IBR program. Because of this, your total loan amount at the end of 25 years will be over $1 million dollars. But that’s alright, because it will all be wiped in the end anyways, right? (PS: In order to equal the accruing interest rate, without even touching the principal balance ever, you would need to be making more than $300,000 / year. Yikes.)
  • Consider your spouse’s income. It is important to note that under REPAYE, your spouse’s income counts as part of the discretionary income. Depending on your spouse’s income, this can increase your monthly loan payments, which will actually increase the amount you pay long term.
  • Forgiven amounts are taxed. This is a crucial part of the clause for the loan forgiveness programs. Those who miss this will be shocked at the end of the 25 years. I actually have met colleagues who have been graduated 3 and 5 years who are not aware of this rule. When I told them that the forgiven amounts will be taxed, their jaws dropped. Why? Because none of them knew. This single rule is what made me question whether loan forgiveness was worth it. As mentioned before, under IBR, with a loan as large as $550k, after twenty five years of payment from a dentist with $135,000 income, you would end up with over one million dollars in debt. I think my number was closer to $1,200,000. This was calculated with the assumption that I would be increasing my salary to more than $135,000 as I increased my experience. Either way, at year 25, the loans will be forgiven, and the total amount forgiven will be considered income that you made that year, and will be taxed similarly. So at the end of 25 years, I was expected to pay north of $350,000, in one lump sum, on top of taxes of the income I made on that year. Unless you have a plan to be swimming in some serious dough in twenty five years, I would say it would be advisable to save up for that $350,000 over 25 years. So that’s an additional $1,166 every month you have to save. But what bothered me most was the total amount of money you would pay after loan forgiveness. It turns out, with the taxed income, you would pay more money than the standard repayment. Standard repayment will lead to a total of $720,000 going towards loans, whereas IBR will lead to a grand total of $856,250. Plus, you would have a loan hanging over your head for 25 years, instead of only 10 years (less than half the amount of time). The time may not seem such a big deal, but that is a very large psychological strain to put on yourself for a very long amount of time. Let’s say you were ahead of your class and graduated dental school at 25. This loan would be with you until you’re 50 years old. That’s a really long time.
  • There is no clause stating that you are guaranteed to be grandfathered in the loan forgiveness program. While I would love to believe that we will all be one hundred percent grandfathered into these programs, we must not be in denial, and agree to the fact that there is no such clause that guarantees this to be the case. This program may be subject to future changes with changes in government. 25 years is a very long time, and the government changes can occur in a short time span within those 25 years. For example, what if a law passes that changes the loan forgiveness program from being 25 years to 30 years? What if you were so far in, that all you’ve done the last twenty years was increase your loan to a point of no return? You would then have to go through with the additional five years, thus increasing your loan total even more, which then increases the final amount you’ve paid for your education. Or what if the programs are abolished completely? Perhaps you would get some help, perhaps you would be grandfathered in, but perhaps they do nothing to help you, leaving you with over a million dollars’ worth of debt in your forties that you must now pay off. People may say, that’s crazy, they can’t do that to us! Unfortunately, until I see a statement saying otherwise, I will continue to believe that anything can happen. That may just be me, being overly cautious. Or realistic, whichever.

APPLICATION: OUR DECISION TREE

So which program did we choose? As I stated before, initially, we were told that this was the way to go, so we decided to choose one category to fall under. Unfortunately, we immediately had to eliminate PAYE because I had student loans that were disbursed before October of 2011, which were my undergraduate loans. So we were down to either IBR or REPAYE. Both will take 25 years before the student loans were forgiven. It may seem as if REPAYE would be the best option, because it only requires 10% of discretionary income to be paid, whereas IBR requires 15% of discretionary income to be paid. However, we chose IBR over REPAYE because of the married borrowers section of the chart. IBR allows Mike and me to file separately, which means Mike’s income is not calculated in that 15%. Whereas REPAYE will calculate Mike’s income into the 10% owed every year, regardless of our filing status. This fact alone makes a huge difference in how much we end up paying. Without giving away the actual numbers, the example below will demonstrate this point. Under IBR, a combined income of $200,000 will yield a $2,500 check per month being written towards student loans, whereas a single income of $100,000 will yield a $1,250 check per month towards student loans. One may argue that it is better to pay down a higher portion of the loans so that at the end of the 25 years, the amount left over that you will be taxed on is less. However, if you choose to do the loan forgiveness program, it will actually benefit you most if you pay the least amount possible. Your total payment will be less in the long run. Notice how filing together will require $2,500 per month to be paid towards your loans, which is still not enough to cover the accruing interest. So even with the increased amount you are paying, the loan total will still be increasing. The numbers ended up showing that it would be better to pay taxes on a slightly larger number, than it is to pay twice as much every month without ever even touching principle. Off course, this is of the assumption that your spouse and you make the same income for work. In order to check what works best for your situation, I would recommend running your own numbers, using your loan amounts and your incomes.

I would like to reiterate that I am no expert. I can’t tell you which plan is better for you, and it is highly likely that I don’t know all the ins and outs of all three plans. But this is what I’ve learned so far, and our method of thinking. If there are ever any doubts, just run projections and calculations and excel sheets, and go with the numbers. The numbers won’t lie. I hope this has been helpful to some, and I hope more people realize the importance of thinking about this early on in their careers after reading this post. If you ever need someone to walk you through it, may I recommend a CFP? I wish you the best of luck in your endeavors, and more future insightful posts on finance to come!

Finance: Tackle Undergrad Loans During A Gap Year (ASAP)

There are a few financial decisions that I made in my early twenties that I am very proud of, and a few that I am not so proud of. For decisions that fall in the latter category, I sincerely wish that someone could just create a time machine so that I could send myself back to my younger self and shake some common sense into her. Or at least allow me to go back in time and have a one-on-one discussion (likely at a cafe somewhere) regarding my retrospectively realized financial mistakes, with the hopes of guiding her towards the right direction. But alas, there is no time machine.

However, knowledge lost to me should not be lost to others. I am fortunate enough to have a little brother, six years younger, who recently shocked everyone we knew by deciding to switch from pursuing a path to physical therapy to becoming a dentist such as myself. At first, I told him not to do it, mostly out of fear that he was entering the profession for the wrong reasons. It’s not exactly the profession for everyone. You have to love being inside people’s mouths, and I sincerely believe that description fits a very small group of people. And in exchange for this privilege of being surrounded by teeth, there is a costly price, which includes not only dedicated time towards earning the degree, but a huge monetary cost as well. I could see a young man entering the profession thinking it’s all fun and games. You can call your own hours, you get a decent pay. But you lose a lot of hours compared to your peers, studying the craft and paying off the debt. Additionally, you don’t see a majority (in my case, any) of your pay if you are dedicated to paying off the loans by the time your 38 years old. And by the time you are free from the debt, your peers would have had a 17 year head start on building their lives over you. I was simply afraid he would become a tooth doctor and then regret the bondage and the responsibility that comes with that. The worst you can do is choose to spend your days doing something you don’t absolutely love.

After a lot of back-and-forth conversations about the whys and the whats and the hows, I could see this is what he decided he wanted to do. And in my family, once we made up our mind about something, there is no change of course. Despite my resistance to the whole thing, I could tell he was going to push through with it, whether I supported him or not. So I did what any big sis would do. I immediately switched to supportive mode, figuring that if he is going to do this thing, then I’m going to give all I’ve got to making sure he loves every moment of it. So now we work together at the same office, me guiding him towards becoming a better dental assistant everyday, and him helpfully suctioning saliva out of my patient’s mouths. Perfect harmony.

I started writing the finance part of my blog to help newly graduated dental students with a massive debt realize that they are not alone, and that there are ways to overcome that debt. Now, I have an even bigger responsibility to walk my little brother, and other newly graduated undergrads towards a path that would minimize that final number, as much as humanly possible. If I can’t send myself back in a time machine to save myself from all the silly mistakes, I can at least try to save my brother. I am not doing this so that he could be rich one day. Such is never my goal. I am writing this so he can be a free man.

So if I could travel back and tell my recently graduated undergrad self what to do while waiting to get into grad school, I would tell them one thing. Use your hard-earned money towards paying down your undergrad loans. This was a very feasible thing for me, since I graduated undergrad in 3.25 years and I had an extra 9 months of freedom between graduation and grad school. It was a year and eight months before I was to start my dental program. During that time, I was living at home, and working three jobs. The first was a job as a dental assistant, averaging thirty hours a week. . The second was a visuals specialist at Banana Republic, averaging ten hours a week. And the last was a tutoring gig in Newport Beach, averaging an additional 10 hours a week. All jobs paid me over minimum wage, which at the time was around $8.5 an hour. The dental assisting and the tutoring paid me $13/hr. The sales job paid me above $9/hr. I wasn’t paying for food or rent, with much gratitude towards my parents. But I was also not paying my student loans down. So where did the money go?

At that age, you work like I did and think to yourself, “I’m rolling in the dough.” I had no concept of the power of money at that time, for I had no one to show me, or to even talk to me about it. Friends were dining out every night, going to concerts and raves, watching movies, and buying everything they ever wanted. What did you think I did?There was no outward consideration towards my far off future. I couldn’t see that these loans would one day become shackles that slow me down from enjoying later joys. There was this concept being fed to young kids, summarized in four capital letters. YOLO.

I was twenty one years old, and I thought I was unstoppable. I had so much energy, I worked like a horse. I never realized that the pace was unsustainable and that I will not want to work like a horse for the rest of my life. And off course, once I clocked out, I went on partying like an animal. (Okay, not animal. I saw REAL animals in college, and animal I was not. Maybe a tame deer. Either way…) I  blew my money on frivolities, living my life under the following motto: “Work hard, party hard.” WHO COMES UP WITH THESE THINGS?!

I  wasn’t fully irresponsible (or so I thought) since I paid the minimum payments towards my loans every month. They told me paying the minimum payments is considered good. No one ever told me paying off the maximum you can possibly pay is ideal. I never even hit my principle balance. I was paying so little that my accrued interest stayed about the same. At the time, I was already dating my future husband, and he was also working hard to pay for his housing. Since I didn’t pay for rent, I thought I had wayyyyy more money than him, and offered to take him out to eat whenever I felt like it. I bought him many gifts, just because. I invited him to concerts and bowling and karaoke and anything I can throw my money at. What I didn’t realize was that he had almost zero debt. He took out a skimpy little loan, which was paid off a few months after he started work as an engineer. And there I was, almost two years graduated, with the same debt I had while I was in school.

I was even so foolish as to plan a trip to Hawaii with Mike. In preparation for this trip, and as a reward for working so hard on my year and a half off, I quit all three jobs pre-emptively at the end of May, three months before dental school was to start. I continued my usual spending, and then allocated a huge chunk of my hard-earned money towards Hawaii. Granted, that trip was our first trip together and ended up being our favorite trip until we went to New Zealand. So yes, YOLO. You never get the time back, and it was a great experience. But the trip cost something close to $5,000. At the time, my student loan was about $16,000. I spent a third of my debt on a vacation, without realizing that it’s all just borrowed money. The crazy part was that I had $5,000 in my bank account, (I actually had close to $10,000 in my bank account) ready to be used for Hawaii. That money should have been placed directly into student loans the minute I was earning it. Not knowing anything at all about the power of compounded interest, that could have saved me a good portion of my current loan amount, probably around $13,000 or so, since it accrued interest over the next 5 years that I was in dental school. That’s the thing about any loan with interest. It continues to add even more debt to your plate, and the longer you wait, the more money you waste. As a young twenty something, time is on your side. Address debt while you are still young.

Now, you may be saying, $13,000 out of $550,000 is not a big difference. It’s such a small sliver of the pie! But it is, because it all adds up. It’s not like you graduate and start paying back the principle on your loans right away. You address the interest that has been growing on it first. For the first five months, we didn’t even touch our principle. Five months of all of the paychecks of a dentist going towards a loan, and not bringing down principle can be a very depressing thing. I think people need to see that. Extrapolate that for 9-10 years, as if you are essentially working for no take home pay for ten years, and then tell me that the $13,000 does not matter. Every single penny matters. That should be the mind set newly graduated undergrads should have. That every financial decision they make will shape their future. Especially so if they are going to pursue further education. It’s not a matter of “YOLO, my future self can worry about that.” Your future self is still you.

If I could do it all over again, I would continue to live at my parents, like I was doing. That was definitely a decision I was proud of. I would put as much of my income as possible (which would have probably been 90% of it) towards paying down my undergrad loans prior to grad school. I would have worked harder while I had a lot of energy. I would have saved more by saying no to all the pressures to conform to this image of a successful, newly  graduated student. I would have worked until the very end of my “time off”. I would have probably skipped the Hawaii trip, or traded it in for a more financially friendly local trip to a national park. If I had done all of this, I would have been able to pay off all of my undergrad loans easily, while still living a fairly decent lifestyle, and possibly saving money along the way for my future graduate loans. Heck, I might have even been able to go to Hawaii and do that. Don’t believe me? Here’s the math.

Dental assisting: $13/hr x 30 hrs/week x 78 weeks = $30,420

Banana Republic: $9/hr x 10 hrs/week x 78 weeks = $7,020

Tutoring: $13/hr x 10 hrs/week x 78 weeks = $10,140

Total income: $47,580

Student Loans Total when I started dental school = approximately $16,000

Conclusion: I didn’t know anything about money at the age of twenty one.

Currently, my brother is gallivanting around Costa Rican terrain with a college friend. Before he left, I went over finances with him, grilling him on what he was planning to do while there, how much he was planning to spend, and pointing out tips to save money while traveling. The bottom line is that I can’t stop him from enjoying his life. I’m not even saying his trip is a life mistake. The Hawaii trip was a financial mistake, but it was also an experience that led us to realize how important traveling was to us. Ironically, the debt limits the extent with which we can travel. You win some, you lose some. He will likely learn something very valuable about himself on his travels. But I want him to at least hear from somebody that this decision will affect his future from a financial standpoint. I think every newly graduated kid deserves to hear that. If I could talk to my twenty year old self, I can’t guarantee she would have listened, or even fully understood. I mean, I would continue to make this mistake throughout all of dental school, again and again. But there is a chance that she would have changed her course, ever so slightly. And that makes a difference.

 

Paying down student debt: Where to start

For the past few months, I have written about my debilitating student debt (We started with $538,000 with $36,000 already accrued interest at 6.7% interest rate) and the reasons I have for tackling it mercilessly and quickly. What I have learned (by the sheer number of people who have approached me and asked me how I was doing the impossible), is that there is a huge interest in the community of recently graduated students (or even people who have graduated 5-10 years ago who still have student debt) to do the exact same thing. It’s crazy to me that no one ever tells us just how. I remember taking an exit course in dental school and meeting with “financial counselors” about how I can pay back the debt fastest, and they told me that it will be best if I just leave the debt, pay the minimum payment under a loan forgiveness program, let the interest (and overall total) accrue for 25 years, and then have the loan forgiven and pay the taxes on your now-over-a-million-dollars debt. It’s alright if you end up prolonging the debt longer and paying more in the long run, because by then, you’d have saved up money and be super rich. Yeah, super rich in debt. I’m a numbers kind of gal, and their approach towards paying down student loans would probably appeal to a more emotionally inclined person. The numbers just didn’t add up for me. So I kept pursuing and pursuing, until I found a way. Current update: still pursuing a faster way. Never giving up.

Firstly, I would like to say that I tend to avoid writing how-to blogs, mostly because I don’t like telling people what to do, which is mostly because I don’t like people telling me what to do. Treat others the way you want to be treated, they say. But I’ve been getting enough questions that I think it would be more efficient to just write about it.

Second, there is not one way to go about paying down student debt, just as there is not one right way to deal with finances. You must take into account your ideal lifestyle, your life mission, your personality, and your current life situation as well. I am not writing this how-to in any definitive sort of way. I am just walking you through to how I got here, with some actionable tips that have been helpful to me, and may be helpful to you.

  1. Find a purpose. There has to be a reason why you want to pay down the student debt, but you need much more than the purpose behind paying down the loans. Obviously, that would be easy to determine. Reasons such as, to get rid of debt, to owe no money, to be financially free, to be rich, are all easily identifiable purposes behind paying down a debt. As an extremist, I had to go a hundred times deeper than that. I identified my life purpose, or what some people would call their mission statement. I realized that I wanted to have freedom from everything (hence the dislike for people telling me what to do, ever). In order to get the freedom to do whatever it is that I wanted, I had to not be tied down by material goods, jobs, or anything related to money, including student loans. I want to be creative, to have the ability to drop whatever I am doing to pursue a passion. Whether that is ridding myself of all my belongings and traveling the world with just a backpack, to creating art or side projects, or opening something as mundane as a coffee shop with my husband, or the ultimate dream, which is to be a temp and to do all these things and more, I needed to be free. Finding a purpose such as this is way more powerful that any of the reasons I listed to pay down student debt. It will provide you with the long-term motivation and inspiration that you need to tackle something as massive as half a million dollars, or in my case, more. When money is the reason for your actions, it is very easy for money to take over your life. I needed something much more substantial than money, much more positive than money, much more inspiring and uplifting. And it’s been working so far. We have been on track for 6 months (we started in May 2017), and things are looking up. We went from 25 years to 10 years to 9 years, and my goal is to get that even further down to 7 years. How awesome would that be?! $574,000 with 6.7% interest paid down in 7 years.
  2. Overcome emotional intelligence, and think long-term. With regards to student loans, it is very easy for people to opt for loan forgiveness. Many “financial advisors” will actually promote this option, and they successfully convince you to do so by appealing to your emotional intelligence. They tell you that with student loan forgiveness, you end up paying less than you would for the ten year plan, and then you just have to pay taxes on the forgiven amount at the end of 25 years. When you point out that adding the taxes at the end of the 25 years causes it to be way more than the ten year plan, they say one of the following things: “Yes, but by then you’ve earned so much money that it wouldn’t be a problem” or “Then you wouldn’t have to deal with the stress of making your payments for ten years” or my absolute favorite, “Yes, but for most people, it isn’t possible to pay it off in ten years”. Translation: Putting it off to deal with later is way easier than dealing with the problem now. Hence they are only trying to convince you that emotionally, this is the best way. It’s this idea of instant gratification versus delayed gratification. Off course this appeals to a lot of people because it gives them instant gratification. They can spend their 20’s, 30’s, and 40’s applying only a small percent of their income towards their loans and using a majority of it for themselves, to buy homes, to travel, to acquire all the social status symbols of wealth that tell the world, “Hey! Look at me! I am a successful and rich person capable of acquiring all of these But let’s just ignore that growing pile of debt that I owe. Keep looking at all the things I’m spending to show you how rich I am.” Which, hey, works for some people. Like I said in step number one, you need to figure out your life mission and if that’s your life mission, then keep doing what you’re doing. No judgments passed here. Just a different perspective. Also, it makes me think back to the published Marshmallow test, where they put a bunch of kindergarteners in a room with a marshmallow. You are either given the choice of instant gratification (eating the marshmallow right away), or delayed gratification (waiting for one hour, which in the case of a five year old is eternity, and receiving a second marshmallow if you survive). Those who choose delayed gratification end up with 2 marshmallows, and I think they measured future success as well, but you’d have to go and read it for yourself. This isn’t to say that delayed gratificators WILL be guaranteed more success in the long run. We don’t talk in absolutes here, and success is defined in so many different ways that the area starts to turn gray. But don’t let emotional intelligence be your deciding factor as to which path to choose. Run the numbers. Run the numbers in all sorts of possible future scenarios, and then find the excel sheet that most closely matches the life you want to lead. After all, you got a college education. You’re smart enough to do that, I know it. It’s just a matter of grit, and a little bit of common sense. And if you do find that waiting out on the loan repayment in exchange for heavy savings now is a good trade off, then all the more power to you! But I’m fighting for my freedom, not for the riches.
  3. Find a team of supporters. When I was about to graduate, I reached out to the aforementioned financial advisors and had one-on-one meetings with them. When I wasn’t satisfied with their answer, I brought Mike with me to some of those meetings to see if he could see any way to pay it off in ten years. He came to the same conclusion as the counselors, which is to pay off the debt in 25 years. I still wasn’t happy with that so I sought out a financial advisor. Who also initially looked at our current savings and income (this was right when I started working) and said it wasn’t possible. I sought and sought and sought, and I think I convinced myself so much that I started to convince others around me too. In April of 2017, less than one year after I graduated, my financial counselor said, “Oh my god. I think you guys can do this.” And then Mikey started saying, “Oh my god. I think we can do this.” And I started saying, “Off course we can. I knew we can do this!” Okay, so the honest truth is, it wasn’t just my convincing that did the trick. I owe a lot of our successes to our financial advisor and to Mikey. I must stop and say that yes, a financial advisor is the way I chose to go with, but it is NOT the only way. This is still perfectly doable without hiring a financial advisor. Likewise, hiring a financial advisor does not guarantee you will get it done either. It will require a lot of hard work on your part, because at the end of the day, you are responsible for your own finances. Lastly, there are many types of financial advisors out there. Some of them are affiliated with third parties and have a hidden agenda or interest. Beware of those ones. Others just tell you what to do, without going through the whys, and even others do not even bother to follow up. Beware of those too. I honestly got lucky in finding one who has no third party affiliations and who is more interested in the whys of finances rather than the whats. He helps educate us about finances and he has been very accessible and thorough in teaching us how to better manage money. I’ve recommended him to so many people and even those who have had financial planners before or are skeptical about paying someone to help handle their money (I know, counter-intuitive on paper, but really it isn’t), have reached out to him, and have found that there is a way. He and Mike are my two strongest support systems for paying off the student debt. I think everyone needs a support system. 10 years of loan repayment is equivalent to 120 recurring monthly payments of large sums of your hard-earned income. There is a point where you will wonder if you chose the right path. Once you choose paying your loans down, it wouldn’t make financial sense to turn around and go back to loan forgiveness. You just end up losing money that way, especially if you turn around near the beginning, where most people give up. Which is why having a purpose will really help you to push through. And when it feels hopeless and the purpose isn’t enough, then you will need your support. So make sure to pick a good one.
  4. Run numbers again and again. This commitment will take a lot of hard work. You can’t just put in a number on your auto-pay and leave it there for 10 years. Things change. Opportunities arise, and life happens. I am constantly re-assessing my situation. I run numbers day in and day out, multiple times a day if possible. I track all of our spending on YNAB, which is an online budgeting tool that our advisor set up for us at the beginning to get a feel for how money comes and goes in our household. You can use any budgeting tool you want, or just create an excel sheet and track transactions. I find that an online budgeting tool cuts the work in half by automatically downloading all transactions. What you find by tracking all of this and by constantly re-assessing is that you continually improve on being in control of your assets. I ask for spreadsheets and spreadsheets of extrapolations of our future earnings and spending and loan payments when any change in our current situation comes up. Mike got a new job, how does this affect us? I just got a raise, how does this affect us? We want to leave the country for two weeks, how does this affect us? Everything is budgeted, calculated, and accounted for. And what I’ve found is that the more you do it, the more it becomes second nature. The thought-process is almost intuitive and you start to apply it to every life decision you make. And the decisions get easier and easier. You no longer think, “Okay, should I be spending money on this?” but rather, “If I spend money on this, this will be what happens, and if I don’t, that will be what happens.” And then you just choose the outcome you want, and there is your answer. The decisions become very technical rather than emotional, which makes them easier to make. I’ve always loved numbers. I think it comes down to the math, and if the math says there is a way, then there is a way. And I will find that way, no matter what.
  5. Accountability. This is my last and final point. I share a lot of my life decisions and my biggest goals via Instagram or my blog, or by just sharing it with everyone I know in my daily interactions. It is not because I want attention or I want to boast. I am actually a very introverted and shy person. When I was younger, I had difficulty sharing anything, because I was afraid of being judged. Now I share everything because I want to be judged if I don’t follow through. It holds me accountable for my crazy ideas and statements. And because I still fear judgment to some extent, once I tell somebody I am doing something, I try my absolute best to get it done. To prove to the world that I can do what I set out to do. If I fail, well, I am no longer embarrassed of judgments due to failure as long as I tried my damndest. I’m more embarrassed of not trying hard enough, and not following through. So yes, I share it all. And I think something as big as this, you’ll want to share too. Hopefully it will garner you a whole community of supporters, people rooting for you to reach the end. You’ve got at least one standing right here. But if anything, share it in order to solidify your reserve to do what everyone says is impossible. Because I can tell you right now, it is not as impossible as they want you to believe.